House Dems Beg Colleagues Not to Retire

Michael Candelori/shutterstock.com
Michael Candelori/shutterstock.com

If it’s not clear by now, let me tell you, the Democrats are in for a rough year. And they know it. Perhaps that is why no less but definitely more than two dozen leftist House members have announced their retirement in the past few months.

But that’s also precisely the reason why several of their colleagues have since resorted to begging.

According to a Tuesday report by The Washington Times, one such individual is Democratic Representative Emanuel Cleaver from Missouri. Cleaver knows that the ship is sinking and fast. But rather than abandon it just yet, he’s trying to convince those who have already committed to the jump to change their mind.

In particular, he’s been speaking to Wisconsin Democrat Ron Kind, who announced his retirement back in August.

While not all Democratic losses will be all that hard to bear, the loss of Kind will be especially rough for Dems. CNN noted that he won his reelection bid by less than three points in 2020. In addition, his district went to former President Donald Trump that same year.

And with a year like we just had filled with Democratic failures like inflation, an ongoing border crisis, international humiliation, and a government that seems hell-bent on destroying all we hold dear, it’s not a stretch to see the district choosing someone a bit more conservative to represent them in our nation’s capital.

So, Cleaver is begging him to “reconsider.” He told the Times, “Nobody had joy when Ron Kind announced he was not going to run.”

But Kind has made it pretty clear that he’s not going to be changing his mind. And he would ask that everyone, including Cleaver, respect that decision, as it is apparently “an inherently personal decision between the member, their family, and whether they want to do it for the rest of their lives,” as Kind says.

Oh, it’s personal, alright. Should those in already sticky situations run again, they have to know their chances of winning are slim. And such a loss would only cause further embarrassment not only to the party but to them. Getting out now, with his dignity somewhat still intact, means that he could possibly live to fight another day, even if that day is far, far into the future.

And he’s not alone in that thinking.

As I mentioned, no small number of his colleagues have made the same decision. In fact, in one 24-hour period in December, three of them announced their plans to jump ship.

The Times also spoke to Democratic Representative Lou Correa of California on the topic. He said that for most of those retiring, they “think it’s just too much battle up here.” In fact, he himself even thought of calling it a day. It is noted that in 2020 Correa won his reelection bid with nearly 70 percent of the vote in his district.

That means that if even someone as popular and well-placed in his district as Correa is having second thoughts about running again, those in a less secure position are definitely doing the same. No wonder so many are retiring rather than being forced out.

But it also means that the majority the Democrats are barely hanging on to is already lost.

While there are over two dozen Dems retiring come November, only has as many Republicans are set to do the same. And it’s noted that at least a fourth of them, if not a third, are Republicans in name only, also known as RINOs.

These are Representatives like Adam Kinzinger, who joined House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s charade of a committee to “investigate” the January 6 incursion on the Capitol. Also retiring are Representatives John Katko from New York and Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio, both of whom joined the Democrats, along with Kinzinger to impeach Trump shortly after the protests in the Capitol last January.

As the Republican Congressional Committee’s spokesman Mike Berg says, “calling it quits” is a “smart choice” for retiring Democrats. They can either do that “or lose next fall.”

And if there is one thing the Dems hate more than Donald Trump, it is losing… Well, maybe it takes a close second place.